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Dutch Case Suggests Risks Posed by Gays in the Military

October 16, 2008
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An October 15 report from a court in Groningen, The Netherlands, illustrates the elevated risk that open homosexuality would pose to our servicemen and women. According to Breitbart.com, several gay men who attended "sex orgies" in that country told a judge that a "three-member gay gang" tried to deliberately infect them with the AIDS virus.

Consider that the individuals involved in this heinous case chose to be in the situation that led to the alleged assaults. Under military conditions, servicemembers have no choice with whom they are assigned.

The military routinely denies induction to individuals whose weight, height, eyesight, prior injury and other health factors it determines disqualifying. It does so in order to maintain the most able and ready force possible. The induction of persons known to be at higher risk of HIV infection would force the military to compromise that principle. Persons testing positive for HIV are not eligible for induction, but if they become infected, current law requires that they must be retained but classified as non-deployable. There is no reason why the military should assume additional risks and non-deployability costs by recruiting or retaining men who engage in homosexual conduct, who are known to have far greater rates of HIV infection.

CMR President Elaine Donnelly made this point and more while testified on the issue of gays in the military before the House Armed Services Personnel Subcommittee. A summary of her statement described several incidents in which homosexual servicemen infected others with the HIV virus. (See pages 6-9) Congress must consider these issues seriously before taking any action with regard to the law excluding homosexuals from military service.

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Interested readers, including members of the military, are invited to comment through the "Confidential Contact" site on this website, www.cmrlink.org. Nothing in the CMR SITREP Blog is intended to aid or hinder elections or the passage of legislation before Congress.


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