Issues Research & Analysis
More background information and historic documents on this topic may be available in the 'Essential Resources' section of this website, or in a previous edition of CMR E-Notes, archived here.
January 14, 2002
The Army has issued a comic book-style guide for soldiers that purports to "clarify" the rules for reporting prohibited homosexual conduct, and for refraining from harassing suspected homosexuals. Titled "Dignity and Respect: A Training Guide on Homosexual Conduct Policy," the full-color 30-page pamphlet contains scenes of soldiers encountering situations involving persons who reveal their homosexuality, or are suspected of being gay. Rather than clarifying the terms of the 1993 law that excludes homosexuals from the military, the comic book conveys the false impression that homosexuals are eligible to serve in the military, provided that they do not admit that they are homosexuals. . . Read More

January 14, 2002

An extensive study ordered by British Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon has reportedly recommended that women should not be allowed to fight in the front line. Citing evidence gathered over 18 months, the "Combat Effectiveness Gender Study" concluded that females lack the strength and stamina needed to serve in the infantry, armored regiments, Royal Marines or the RAF Regiment, the Air Force’s infantry unit.

In compiling the study for review by the Chiefs of Staff, British Army officials gathered information from several other countries with gender-integrated armed forces, and carried out tests of physical capabilities in Wales. According to the London Sunday Times, June 24, 2001, the women performed comparatively poorly in physical tasks:

· In a test requiring soldiers to carry 90 lbs. of artillery shells over measured distances, the male failure rate was 20%. The female failure rate was 70%.

· In a 12.5-mile route march carrying 60 lbs. of equipment, followed by target practice simulating conditions under fire, men failed in 17% of cases. . .

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January 14, 2002

Four days after the September 11 Attack on America, the New York Times published an obituary of retired Rear Adm. Wilson "Bud" Flagg, who was a passenger on the American Airlines flight that was seized by terrorists and slammed into the Pentagon. The astonishingly insensitive item highlights widespread ignorance about the Tailhook scandal and the overly zealous investigations and "witch-hunts" that followed it.

To clear up some of the confusion and to discourage future affronts to the families of naval aviators who were affected by Tailhook, CMR has written directly to the New York Times, and posted the March 1994 National Review article by Elaine Donnelly, titled "The Tailhook Scandals," elsewhere on this website.

The September 15 New York Times obituary reads as follows: "Wilson Flagg, a Retired Admiral, Dies at 62 Wilson Flagg, a retired rear admiral who was one of three admirals censured by the Navy over the 1991 Tailhook sexual-assault scandal, died in the American Airlines plane that crashed into the Pentagon, his family said yesterday. His wife, Darleen, also died in the crash. Both were 62. On Oct. 15, 1993, the secretary of the Navy, John H. Dalton, censured Admiral Flagg along with Vice Adm. Richard Dunleavy and Rear Adm. . .

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January 14, 2002
On October 15, 1993, Rear Admiral Riley Mixson, Chief of the Navy's Air Warfare Division, received a letter of censure from new Secretary of the Navy John Dalton. Dalton hit Mixson for being responsible for the arrangements of the 1991 Tailhook convention, the military's worst sex scandal in history. The rebuke was fired like a showy missile attack, staged for the benefit of CNN. But Mixson defended himself with a letter that convincingly refuted Dalton's charges. He wrote that during most of the time plans were being made for the infamous convention in Las Vegas, he was half a world away directing combat operations during Desert Storm. "I can assure you," Mixson wrote, "my thoughts in the Red Sea were not on Tailhook '91." In fact, Mixson hadn't attended Tailhook in 13 years, and was shocked to see how gross its nightlife had become. . . Read More

From: Tags
January 14, 2002
Plans to call up pregnant soldiers for active duty in the aftermath of the September 11 Attack on America were reportedly reversed by the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, David Chu. According to Insight magazine, Pentagon planners were stunned to learn that when President George W. Bush authorized the calling up of up to 50,000 reservists and additional National Guard units, the only question asked by Clinton-Administration holdovers in the Pentagon, with regard to pregnant soldiers, was whether they should be exempt from active duty obligations in the second or third trimester. . . Read More