Congress/Legislation
February 22, 2012
The newly-enacted LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) Law and related policies in the military have created irreconcilable conflicts that have yet to be resolved.  The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees rights of conscience and religious freedom to both chaplains and military personnel.  Department of Defense policy statements, however, clearly indicate that the administration intends to infringe on rights of conscience and religious liberty in the course of fully implementing LGBT law and related policies in the military. . . Read More

October 26, 2011
Twenty-four hours after final repeal of the 1993 law usually called "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" on September 20, Defense Department officials revealed their true intent regarding same-sex marriage in the military.  In two policy memoranda, the Pentagon authorized the use of military facilities for "private ceremonies," and the option for chaplains to conduct those "functions" without official endorsement by the Defense Department. . . Read More

October 5, 2006

On September 13, 2006, Sen.George Allen (R-VA) raised the issue of women in combat in his campaign for re-election to the U.S. Senate. According to news reports, the Allen campaign sponsored a high-profile news conference criticizing a Washingtonian magazine article titled “Women Can’t Fight,” written by Democratic challenger James Webb in 1979.

Video of female former officers and Naval Academy graduates who spoke at that news conference, is prominently displayed on Allen’s campaign website. In response, Webb has lined up military women to speak on his behalf. It would be far more reassuring if the candidates would take this issue seriously, instead of using military women as campaign props. . . Read More

October 7, 2005
There is no reason to doubt the integrity of White House Counsel Harriet Miers, a person whom President George W. Bush trusts and has nominated to the Supreme Court. The Center for Military Readinessis concerned, however, about her actions as White House Counsel on legal matters affecting the military. Ms. Miers does not have a judicial paper trail, but to the greatest extent possible the Senate should consider her record as the president’s chief legal advisor. According to the White House 2001 Project, the Office of White House Counsel sits at the intersection of law, politics and policy. Because of this blend of responsibilities, the most essential function a Counsel can perform for a president is to act as an “early warning system” for potential legal trouble spots. We wish there were some evidence that Ms. Miers has been sufficiently vigilant on matters of concern to CMR. . . Read More

August 18, 2005
CMR has learned that several liberal members of Congress, led by feminists Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) and Susan Davis (D-CA), are working hard to deny any role for Congress in decisions regarding military orders to force(not allow) female soldiers into or near direct ground combat. This is the message of a disingenuous “Dear Colleague” letter circulated by the two women last week with the support of fellow Armed Services Committee members Marty Meehan (D-MA), Ellen Tauscher (D-CA), Madeleine Bordallo (D-GU) and Rick Larsen (D-WA). On the Senate side, Armed Services Committee member Hillary Clinton (D-NY) proposed a resolution to “uphold the role of women serving in combat zones.”. . .
 Read More

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More background information and historic documents on this topic may be available in the 'Essential Resources' section of this website, or in a previous edition of CMR E-Notes, archived here.